1 John 5:12: “Whoever has the Son has life; whoever does not have the Son of God does not have life.”

Jesus will have us any day, any hour. His welcoming heart makes it real easy to love Him. Not to love us is no option for Jesus. He loves us no matter what. He is endeared to us. His passion for us brought Him to planet Earth, right in front of our doorsteps. With our self-destructive tendencies, He came to save us from ourselves.

Endowed with free will, we can have Him or we cannot have Him; it’s completely up to us. The problem is, we will miss out on Life if we won’t have Him. Life is connected to His name. Life comes forth from His fingertips. Healer of broken bodies and broken hearts, one touch of His hands makes a profound difference. We need His touch to be whole. But then, as we reach out to Him, we touch His heart in more ways we will know.

Jesus is touched by our love. Our love does not heal Him because He is whole. He does not need our love as much as we need His, but clearly, it means the world to Him. It’s a mystery to me how the Son of God, who has everything, seeks our friendship. Jesus proudly announced to the world (John 15:15)

“I shall not call you servants any longer, for a servant does not share his master’s confidence. No, I call you friends, now, because I have told you everything that I have heard from the Father.”

Being friends with the Almighty is the most thrilling experience I can think of. God does not run a staff of servants, but He surrounds Himself with friends. That is why Jesus had disciples whom He called His friends. And that is why His heart is open to welcome you and me today. His circle of friends widens with every person that will have Him.

Whoever has the Son has a Friend for life; whoever does not have the Son of God misses out on a Friend for life.

Genesis 41:51-52: “Joseph named his older son Manasseh, for he said, ‘God has made me forget all my troubles and everyone in my father’s family.’ Joseph named his second son Ephraim, for he said, ‘God has made me fruitful in this land of my grief.’”

The other day Joseph’s son accidentally ran into a stranger as he was running backwards to catch a ball. The stranger, clearly annoyed, yelled at him: “Hey you! What’s your name?” “I Forget” “No really! What’s your name?” “My name’s I forget” “You’re weird! How can you forget your own name?”

Of course I made this up, but couldn’t a conversation like this potentially happen if you apply names to your children that mean a lot to you but maybe not so much to your children? The names of the two brothers Ephraim and Manasseh represent his father Joseph’s life experience. And what a life experience he had! A roller coaster of events: from favorite son back home to slave in a foreign country; from a no-name slave in Egypt to Potiphar’s Personal Attendant; from Potiphar’s Personal Attendant to a forgotten prisoner in an Egyptian dungeon; from a forgotten prisoner to the Prison Warden‘s Assistant Manager; from the Prison Warden’s Assistant Manager to Pharaoh’s Second in Command. That’s Joseph’s story, and so he named his kids “Forget” and “Fruitful” because God made him forget the past and made him fruitful in a foreign country. His own name was changed from Joseph to Zaphenath-paneah as if to make the transition into his new life complete. A different name, a different life, a different identity!

Well, not quite! Joseph’s past would catch up with him when a worldwide famine brought his brothers to his doorsteps – the same brothers who sold him to teach him a lesson. The lesson they tried to get across to Joseph: “You may be Dad’s favorite but you’re not better than we are!” As it turned out, they too had a lesson to learn.

Lesson #1: You will be treated just the same way you’ve been treating others. 

Lesson#2: Lies will eventually catch up to you.

More than two decades went by when a time of testing came for both parties: Would Joseph bear a grudge? Would his brothers finally get real? The story fortunately ends on a happy note: his brothers confessed the ugly truth they had kept hidden from their father Jacob for so long; and Joseph completely forgave them. As a result the family was reunited, a dead relationship rekindled and his family saved from starvation in a seven-year drought.

Joseph lived up to his new name Zaphenath-paneah which loosely translated means: “God speaks life”, and Joseph certainly spoke life into a very bad situation! What kind of words do we speak over a hopeless mess? Do we pray to God who sees potential? When God speaks, life flourishes.  That’s His very nature.  We see the world around us as living proof. Connected with Him we become His life agents. We struggle with unemployment, our health, our finances, and we find that God is navigating us through very confusing times – if we dare to look up. Joseph put his trust in God when people meant to harm him.

The truth is, we do not need to be in control. Even though it’s quite unsettling to let things go, at the same time it’s a huge relief! We believe in the same God Joseph believed in, and our faith will transform into our very own life’s story and encourage more people than we’ll ever know!

Isaiah 43:2: “When you go through deep waters, I will be with you. When you go through rivers of difficulty, you will not drown. When you walk through the fire of oppression, you will not be burned up; the flames will not consume you.”

Psalm 90:12: “Teach us to realize the brevity of life, so that we may grow in wisdom.”

Brevity of life – what the Psalmist is referring to here is obviously our lifetime on Earth, which is indeed limited. Our soul, however, is ageless and lives forever!

Certainly, not everybody believes in an afterlife. But even if you don’t, all the more is it important to reap the benefits of being here. What are the benefits? The greatest benefit we derive from being alive is giving back to people. My experience is even if we give just a little bit, we receive so much more in return. It may be a little counter-intuitive to live that way, but then, everything God says is counter-intuitive. Take His famous love commandment for instance (Mark 12:30-31):

“And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind, and all your strength.’ The second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ No other commandment is greater than these.”

It’s not easy to love a random neighbor. And at times it’s not easy to love yourself. Loving God adds the much-needed third dimension into our lives. Without God, life would be just two-dimensional – my neighbor and me. Include God into the equation, and we gain depth perception. With God comes love that outlasts us. He has loved us long before we even recognized Him. With God comes purpose. Yes, Virginia, there is an afterlife, and God is our eternal home. He created us, we came from Him, and that’s where we belong.


Blackbird fly, blackbird fly
Into the light of the dark black night