Isaiah 43:16, 18-19: “I am the Lord, who opened a way through the waters, making a dry path through the sea. “But forget all that— it is nothing compared to what I am going to do. For I am about to do something new. See, I have already begun! Do you not see it? I will make a pathway through the wilderness. I will create rivers in the dry wasteland.”

In a time of need Jacob (one of the many descendants of Abraham) had to move his entire family to Egypt. There he was received with open arms. One of his sons – Joseph – was an influential man in Egypt. That is why Jacob’s family was treated with utter respect and admiration.

Nevertheless, 400 years later all of this was distant memory. Feeling threatened by Israel’s explosive population growth, the Egyptian government sought to wipe them out by enslaving them.

Now it was definitely time to leave Egypt!

Israel’s exodus from Egypt was no minor event. In order to arrive at their destination – a region southeast from the Mediterranean Sea – they had to go through treacherous desert terrain and get past the Red Sea. With their former Egyptian slave-masters on their heels, the Red Sea quickly became a death trap. With their back against the wall, there was simply no way to go!

And Israel cried out to God.

All of a sudden, right before their very eyes, the waters began to recede. Bit by bit water levels decreased until they were able to safely cross over to the other side with their children, their flocks and herds. All of Israel passed through the Red Sea on dry ground! Well, so did the Egyptians, in hot pursuit of the Israelites, but they didn’t get very far. Soon after the last Israelite had set foot on the other shore, the waves of the Red Sea came crashing down; and as the water levels rose, the Egyptian soldiers drowned.

This was the day when the nation of Israel was born. A pivotal point in history for sure and an extraordinary miracle!

And yet, now the Lord says: “Forget this miracle at the Red Sea! This is nothing compared to the miracle about to happen.”

Can you see it?  Sometimes we can’t see the forest from the trees. If every piece of information was a tree, we’d have a forest of information out there; thanks to internet access, all these pieces of information are at our fingertips.  That’s great, but at the same time, that’s a ton of information to sort through.

To cut through this sea of data, I think it’s helpful to remember that there is one tree out there that matters most to humanity: the tree Jesus was nailed to. Looking to this one tree, Jesus’s death and resurrection pulls us all together and draws every human being to Him.

Regardless who we are and where we are from, we all seek our way through the wilderness of life, and in the end, we all die.  The good news is that Jesus has passed through the impassable, and conquered the impossible: death – a crucial turning point for all people, since death enslaves us all! The tree Jesus was nailed to stands for victory over death and offers the fruit of Eternal Life.

In all the good times I find myself longing for change and in the bad times I fear myself.
I’m off the deep end, watch as I dive in
I’ll never meet the ground
Crash through the surface, where they can’t hurt us
We’re far from the shallow now!

John 8:36: “So if the Son sets you free, you are truly free.”

As I was driving down Southern Avenue this morning, I noticed a bumper sticker on the car right in front of me: “Stop texting, just drive!” This made me smile. Actually, beside the obvious practical implications – avoiding accidents while being an alert driver – this little bumper sticker is pretty profound if applied to life in general. How about:

  • Stop worrying, just live!
  • Stop judging, just love!
  • Stop all prejudice, just explore!

Worries, judgmental attitude, and prejudice all distract from living life to the fullest.  Paul calls this kind of life “freedom in Christ”.  In one of his letters he wrote (Galatians 5:1):

 “So Christ has truly set us free. Now make sure that you stay free, and don’t get tied up again in slavery to the law.”

Anything infringing on our God-given freedom is some form of slavery. If caught up in drug and alcohol abuse, we’re enslaved to it. We could also be enslaved to our work, to our possessions, to other people’s expectations and opinions, to our personal anxieties and worries, and the list goes on and on.  The bad thing about slavery is that it keeps us in a box, and we’re unable to unlock our true potential. Jesus wants us to get out of this box – and following Him we will. That’s Jesus redemptive activities in a nutshell!

Quoting from a song in the 60s, freedom is NOT another word for nothing left to lose. Freedom is the opportunity to live the surprising life that we’ll experience when we follow Jesus, and we’ll never know where Jesus will lead us today….we just need to keep an open mind!

If marbles stand for preconceived notions, then we need to let go of all our marbles to keep an open mind. Preconceived notions can infringe on our relationship with God and can also prevent us from reading the Bible altogether. If someone has a bad reputation we usually proceed with caution. Bad reputation will kill any chance of a good relationship. Have you ever noticed that God has a bad reputation to most people who don’t want anything to do with Him? In the same vein, if we ran into some bad experiences with religion don’t you think that would affect our relationship with God?

We need to take advantage of the redeeming qualities of the Son of God who can heal all our hurt and bring us to a place of peace where we don’t have to prove anything, where we can start from scratch with God and abandon any tainted ideas about Him.

Lastly, after we’ve lost all our marbles, let’s stick to this newfound freedom!  Once we are freed from our box, we need to refrain from the lifelong habit of putting other people or even God into a box. Let’s identify and abandon our preconceived notions and get a fresh outlook on life.

Go with God and stick with Jesus. He will defend our freedom like no other.

“You say I took the name in vain
I don’t even know the name
But if I did, well really, what’s it to you?
There’s a blaze of light in every word
It doesn’t matter which you heard
The holy or the broken hallelujah

Hallelujah!”                                                        Leonard Cohen

Ecclesiastes 3:1-3: “For everything there is a season, a time for every activity under heaven. A time to be born and a time to die. A time to plant and a time to harvest. A time to kill and a time to heal. A time to tear down and a time to build up.”

The fact that there is a time for every activity under heaven shows God’s broad-mindedness and wisdom.  Suppose He would not allow certain activities – would that help the world to be a better place? I can see that many would venture an emphatic yes to this question.  I’m not so sure though, because God has been there, done that. At the dawn of creation when God made the first people He asked them to refrain from a certain activity: not to eat the fruit from a forbidden tree. We know the end result and people essentially have not changed.

So God allows forbidden activities – not to make the world a better place, because the world hasn’t changed for the better outside of Eden – God allows forbidden activities for the sake of freedom. And it’s God’s wisdom, patience, and enduring love that sustain us as He gives us time, precious time, to explore and find out for ourselves why the forbidden tree yielded the fruit of death. And since God gave us time to do as we see fit allowing us to do wrong, He takes time to make things right, so mankind has a future and a hope.

God made things right by taking on our ultimate punishment, death, the promised end-result of eating the forbidden fruit. His Son Jesus who has lived before time and lives from everlasting to everlasting, He willingly submitted to the experience of death – so that humanity won’t expire. He died so we can live. He literally ceased to exist before God the Father brought Him back to life on the Third Day when Jesus rose from the grave. It’s just mind-boggling! To this effect Paul wrote to his friends in Ephesus:

“He [God] is so rich in kindness and grace that he purchased our freedom with the blood of his Son and forgave our sins.”

God allows time for everything, the good and the bad, even though He’s the center of the universe and He could easily dictate every minute thing; however, He doesn’t desire robots, but He desires originality, authenticity, surprise; for the very same reason He desires us as friends, not slaves. John, remembering what Jesus related to His friends on the night of His betrayal, wrote in Chapter 15 of his Gospel:

“I no longer call you slaves, because a master doesn’t confide in his slaves. Now you are my friends, since I have told you everything the Father told me.”

God treasures and fights for our precious freedom because love not freely given is no love at all.

Exodus 29:45-46: “Then I will live among the people of Israel and be their God, and they will know that I am the Lord their God. I am the one who brought them out of the land of Egypt so that I could live among them. I am the Lord their God.”

Slavery is not an option; we do not choose to be slaves, we rather become enslaved. Slavery is a reality of life and an unfortunate side effect of our early emancipation from all things God. We wanted a bigger world than the Garden of Eden, and ironically our world got smaller and smaller.  One of the worst case scenarios is depicted in the book of Exodus when the young nation of Israel was used and abused as Egyptian workforce. The world of the Israelis shrunk into mere survival mode.  Getting the job done without getting killed was a daily goal. Living with low self-esteem and suffering daily abuse, their life was considered cheap and replaceable. And apparently, the Egyptian king simultaneously despised and feared them because he decreed to kill their newborn sons to keep Israel’s population growth at bay. Operation “Exodus” started when Moses was called to task. Mission Impossible: Leave Egypt and move a whole nation to a land next to the Mediterranean Sea, formerly known as the land of Canaan, soon to be known as the country of Israel.

Reading the story of Exodus is experiencing human helplessness versus God’s power to redeem. In a very moving statement to Moses God makes His intentions very clear (Exodus 6:6-8): “Therefore, say to the people of Israel: ‘I am the Lord. I will free you from your oppression and will rescue you from your slavery in Egypt. I will redeem you with a powerful arm and great acts of judgment. I will claim you as my own people, and I will be your God. Then you will know that I am the Lord your God who has freed you from your oppression in Egypt. I will bring you into the land I swore to give to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. I will give it to you as your very own possession. I am the Lord!’”

Slavery, unfortunately, leaves its mark on the human spirit. Besides physical abuse there is emotional abuse; dealing with unbridled hatred day in and day out causes both innate fear and bottled up anger. “But the mind can remain free!” you might say.  “No one can tell me what to think!” Well, here comes mind control: Occupy all your time with hard labor; with the cracking whip instructions are continuously forced down your throat from the day you are able-bodied until the day you die.  You will discover that in time your mind gets used to being told what to do and what to think. And this is exactly what several centuries of slavery did to the people of Israel. Moses encountered their broken spirit when they first ran into difficulties during Operation “Exodus”. The Egyptian king would not let Israel go without a fight, and Israel was ready to give up. In the 6th chapter of Exodus we read: “Moses spoke thus to the people of Israel, but they did not listen to Moses, because of their broken spirit and harsh slavery.(…) So Moses told the people of Israel what the Lord had said, but they refused to listen anymore. They had become too discouraged by the brutality of their slavery.”

Built over time, Slave mentality will not dissipate overnight, and also the nation of Israel needed time to heal. A new generation had to grow up with a new mindset: the mindset of the redeemed. We all can learn from Israel’s history. The book of Exodus teaches us a lesson about freedom.  Freedom has a purpose.  Freedom’s purpose is summarized in Exodus, chapter 4 when God sends a request to the Egyptian king: “Let my son [Israel] go, so he can worship me. God put it quite simply here: Our purpose is to worship the Lord. Yet there’s still another purpose to our freedom, and it’s beautiful and astounding. At the end of the 29th chapter of the book of Exodus God says about His people: “I am the one who brought them out of the land of Egypt so that I could live among them.The purpose of Israel’s freedom was to worship God in the land that He provided, a land He too wanted to dwell in!  What is God revealing here? God reveals one of the deeper meanings of His name. His name was earlier revealed to Israel as “I Am”; and part of “I Am” is the encouragement deriving from “I Am with you”, God with us. God wants to live with us; God wants to live in us. In other words: He wants to move in!

In conclusion, freedom’s purpose is twofold:

  1. We’re free to worship God
  2. We’re free so He can dwell among us.

Freedom God provides is meant to be enjoyed in His presence.  With a heart of worship we will enjoy His presence and God will enjoy ours!

“I’m coming back to the heart of worship, and it’s all about You Jesus!” (Song lyrics to “Heart of Worship” by Matt Redman)